Monday, August 18, 2014

The history of Wintersburg Village, the future of Oak View: Preservation and adaptive reuse


   The inclusion of Historic Wintersburg on the National Trust for Historic Preservation's "11 Most Endangered Historic Places" list is a national call to action.  In one truly remarkable property, the nation has the opportunity to save American history while investing in the rebirth of the Wintersburg Village and Oak View neighborhood.

   Why did it make the list?
  • Historic Wintersburg is a rare Japanese-owned pioneer property, predating California's Alien Land Laws of 1913 and 1920 which prohibited Japanese immigrants from owning property. In contrast with other immigrants, Japanese also were prohibited from becoming citizens.
  • Unlike other Japanese American historical properties which relate to World War II confinement, Historic Wintersburg reveals the daily life of the pioneers who settled Orange County.  The mission property--Orange County's oldest Japanese church of any denomination--was the heart of activity for the Japanese community.
  • Despite exclusion, alien land laws, World War II forced evacuation and confinement, and modern urbanization, Historic Wintersburg's goldfish farm and mission survived.  Intact.  All six structures telling the story of California pioneer history. 
  • Part of the "Japanese Mission Trail," the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission is representative  of the migration and settlement pattern of Japanese immigrants in California following increased Pacific Rim interaction.  The Wintersburg Mission was the fifth mission established through the efforts of the national Presbyterian Church, working with a multi-faith group including Buddhists, Episcopalians, and Methodists.
  • Of the handful of noted Japanese properties documented in a 1986 survey of Orange County, the majority have been lost to demolition and development.  The evidence of a significant population of pioneers has almost been erased.

The Furuta bungalow, circa 1914.  The property was lush, planted with gum trees, and fronted the country road of Wintersburg Avenue (now Warner Avenue).  Later, a manicured hedgerow surrounded the front lawn and acres of goldfish ponds filled the farm site. (Photo, Furuta family collection) © All rights reserved.

How does preservation benefit the community?

   Historic Wintersburg is located in a neighborhood of Huntington Beach known as "Oak View," one of the city's lowest economic zones and predominantly Spanish speaking.  Like 100 years ago, the neighborhood has remained diverse.  

   Approximately 10,000 people live in the one-square mile of the former Wintersburg Village and Oak View, with an elementary school immediately adjacent to the Historic Wintersburg property.  As reported in an Orange County Register article in 2013, "the Oak View neighborhood has a higher level of poverty than much of the rest of Huntington Beach, and most residents there are Latinos. Nearly 1,000 children attend the school sites – Oak View Elementary School and Oak View Preschool – and nearly 100 teachers and staff members work at the two schools."

The Oak View Preschool and Elementary School, adjacent to the south end of the Furuta farm at Historic Wintersburg. (Photo, August 2014)

   Some of the issues facing the Oak View neighborhood are diminishing open space, access to fresh foods, access to health care in the neighborhood, job creation and training for advancement, and access to community meeting space for adult and child programs.

   Would demolition of historic features and elimination of open space for commercial / industrial use in Oak View help the neighborhood?  Or, would working with Oak View to on historic preservation combined with adaptive reuse better meet the needs of the neighborhood?

Gunjiro, Hal and Nori Tashima outside the Tashima Market, circa 1920s.  The Tashima Market was located across Wintersburg Avenue from the Wintersburg Mission, in the area of present-day Warner Avenue and Lyndon Lane.  An open field next to the market was home to the first Japanese baseball league in Orange County.  Next to the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks, at a site that now hosts an automobile repair shop, was a blacksmith.  (Photo courtesy of Eugene Tashima) © All rights reserved.

The History of Wintersburg Village, the Future of Oak View

   The modern, outside-the-box preservation approach supported by the National Trust for Historic Preservation considers the history of a property with the present-day community.  Stand alone house museums are not always sustainable and history can coexist with the modern world.  With creative historic preservation, something remarkable can happen.  Neighborhoods can be transformed.

   Imagine entering the property off Warner Avenue, greeted by a scene reminiscent of Wintersburg Village, lush and green, a water feature with goldfish and water lilies, the historic buildings open to the public.  Now add a re-creation of the Tashima Market, providing farm fresh produce and staples at the first floor, with community meeting room space on the second floor (exactly what the Tashima Market provided in the early 1900s).  A walkable market and community center for those living in the neighborhood.

Left: Raymond Furuta on a Caterpillar tractor at the Historic Wintersburg property, circa 1960.  Once highly productive, the property has never been used for anything other than a goldfish and flower farm.  During Rainbow Environmental's ownership, there has been a pumpkin patch and nopale cactus. (Photo, Furuta family collection) © All rights reserved.

   Imagine part of the property returned to farming, providing farm-to-table herbs, specialty vegetables or foods to the chefs of Huntington Beach.  The result: locally produced food, neighborhood jobs of a variety of skill sets, relationships with chefs and restaurants, and a professionally guided path into Huntington Beach's resort and hospitality industry with room to advance.  

   Imagine a neighborhood health clinic, upstairs in the Tashima Market, or as part of the 1947 ranch house (one of the six historic structures on the property).  A walkable place for parents with children and health services for the adjacent preschool and elementary school.

   Jobs, revenue, needed services, beautification, and preservation of community history.  This is just a glimpse of what can be achieved through a modern and creative approach to historic preservation and adaptive reuse.  Preservationists are committed to working with Oak View, the surrounding neighborhood, and the community to achieve a mutually beneficial vision for Historic Wintersburg.

How to help transform a neighborhood


   The Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force needs financial support and partnerships to acquire the property.  It's that simple.  This unique and irreplaceable history can be lost to demolition and potentially replaced with a strip mall and additional industrial use in the neighborhood.  Or, with support, we can recognize the history of Wintersburg Village while creating a new future for Oak View.

The wish list:
  • URBAN LAND INSTITUTE: Funding in the amount of $35,000 is needed for the Urban Land Institute (ULI) technical advisory program (TAP), a critical path priority.  The TAP is a two-day intensive evaluation by a team of land use, preservation, financial and development experts incorporating the input of community stakeholders---those living and working in the neighborhood, the current property owner, the adjacent school and preservationists.  The final report is a nuts-and-bolts tool with practical visions for the ultimate preservation and development of the property. 
  • OUTREACH: Funds for outreach materials and exhibits.  Historic Wintersburg has been offered many opportunities to share the history with educational materials and photography exhibits, including an upcoming exhibit at an Orange County museum.  Donations can help support this important outreach effort which can bring more support for Historic Wintersburg's preservation.
  • STABILIZATION: Funding or pro bono professional services are needed for the stabilization of historic structures.  Some immediate actions can be taken to prevent degradation of the historic structures until their ultimate restoration.  This includes removal of tree branches or other items that can place stress on the buildings.
  • PROPERTY PURCHASE: Donations of all amounts are needed to support the ultimate property purchase and restoration.  The property's current value will be part of the ULI process, however, it is known the approximately 4 1/2 acre parcel was purchased for over $4 million.  There are creative partnerships and development incentives, with the assistance and guidance of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
WINTERSBURG VILLAGE: A glimpse of the diverse community that founded the Wintersburg Mission in 1904 and, in this photo, the Wintersburg Church in 1934.  Congregants and founders stood in front of the Church building along Wintersburg Avenue, then a dusty country road.  The roof line of the Furuta bungalow can be seen in the background.  At that time, there was room to breath in Wintersburg and Oak View. (Photo courtesy of Wintersburg Presbyterian Church) © All rights reserved.

   Help support the preservation of Historic Wintersburg, before pioneer history is lost, and, be part of the future of Oak View.

DONATION INFORMATION: Donations may be as a charitable donation per IRS code 26 U.S.C. 170(c)(1) and are used solely for the Historic Wintersburg project.  Online and mail donation information at http://www.huntingtonbeachca.gov/i_want_to/give/donation-wintersburg.cfm 

Donations to the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Fund are solely for the purpose of historic preservation for the Wintersburg project. Donations may be deductible as a charitable donation, per IRS Code, 26 U.S.C.170(c)(1). - See more at: http://www.huntingtonbeachca.gov/i_want_to/give/donation-wintersburg.cfm#sthash.R2ABVdz6.dpuf
FACEBOOK: Join supporters on the Historic Wintersburg Facebook page for more frequent news and updates at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Historic-Wintersburg-Preservation-Task-Force/433990979985360

© All rights reserved.  No part of the Historic Wintersburg blog may be reproduced or duplicated without prior written permission from the author and publisher, M. Adams Urashima.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

America's 11 Most Endangered 2014

Mapping of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places courtesy of Curbed LA and Google.  Historic Wintersburg is the furthest historical site in the continental American West; a historical church is identified in Hawaii in the Pacific.  We wish everyone on the "11 Most" list the greatest success in saving American history!

   Since the announcement of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places on June 24, 2014, news is spreading about the significant and rare historical site in Huntington Beach, California: Historic Wintersburg.

   Media including the New York Times, Smithsonian Magazine, Time Magazine, to Rafu Shimpo, KNBC, KABC, Los Angeles Times, Orange County Register and Huntington Beach Independent have been sharing the news about Historic Wintersburg.  It is the sole place recognized in California and in the continental western United States.

   We'll be sharing more in depth news and coverage of our press conference at Huntington Beach City Hall.  Meanwhile, here is a little of the media coverage:

Huntington Beach Independenthttp://www.hbindependent.com/news/tn-hbi-me-0626-wintersburg-endangered-20140624,0,1306063.story

Rafu Shimpo (a Japanese - English daily, as old as Historic Wintersburg), http://www.rafu.com/2014/06/wintersburg-site-named-to-list-of-endangered-historic-places/

Smithsonian, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/americas-most-endangered-historic-places-180951839/?utm_source=twitter.com&no-ist

   There will be more to come, as we roll up our sleeves and get help from around the country to preserve the pioneer history of the American West.  Be part of this amazing effort!  Save Historic Wintersburg for future generations!

Representatives from the National Trust for Historic Preservation stand with Historic Wintersburg and members of the pioneer Furuta family after the press conference at Huntington Beach City Hall.  Our iconic goldfish---for Historic Wintersburg's goldfish farming history---can be seen in the backdrop.  (Photo courtesy of Barbara Haynes)

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DONATE to the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Fund and help us save a precious historical site!  Go to http://www.huntingtonbeachca.gov/i_want_to/give/donation-wintersburg.cfm
 
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Historic-Wintersburg-Preservation-Task-Force/433990979985360

Historic Wintersburg author and preservation task force chair, @SurfCityWriter on twitter.

© All rights reserved.  No part of the Historic Wintersburg blog may be reproduced or duplicated without prior written permission from the author and publisher, M. Adams Urashima.

Monday, June 23, 2014

NATIONAL TRUST ANNOUNCES AMERICA'S 11 MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES 2014



AN AMERICAN PIONEER STORY: Artist's rendering of the Yukiko Yajima and Charles Mitsuji Furuta bungalow, from the photograph shown on masthead above, March, 1913.  (Artwork by Huntington Beach resident Barbara Haynes, a member of the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force and Huntington Beach Historic Resources Board, June 2014.) © All rights reserved.

   Historic Wintersburg is pleased and humbled to announce we are one of the National Trust for Historic Preservation's America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places for 2014.


NATIONAL TRUST ANNOUNCEMENT:

Washington (June 23, 2014) – Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, http://www.preservationnation.org/, named Historic Wintersburg in Huntington Beach, Calif. to its 2014 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places, http://www.preservationnation.org/issues/11-most-endangered/. This annual list spotlights important examples of the nation’s architectural, cultural and natural heritage that are at risk of destruction or irreparable damage. More than 250 sites have been on the list over its 27-year history, and in that time, only a handful of listed sites have been lost.

Historic Wintersburg documents three generations of the Japanese American experience in the United States, from immigration in the late 19th century to the return from incarceration in internment camps following World War II. The site contains six extant pioneer structures and open farmland, and is one of the only surviving Japanese-owned properties acquired prior to California’s anti-Japanese “alien” land laws of 1913 and 1920. In contrast to Japanese American confinement sites from the World War II era, Historic Wintersburg captures the daily community life and spiritual institutions of Japanese settlers as they established a new life in America.

Historic Wintersburg is a unique cultural site that tells the important story of early Japanese American immigrants as they sought to make a new life and build a community in Southern California,” said Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, “We strongly support a collaborative effort that preserves Wintersburg’s historic landscape while building upon its longstanding role as an educational and supportive space for the Huntington Beach community."

The site also chronicles the multigenerational story of the Furuta family, Japanese pioneers who cultivated a farm for close to a century, helped establish Japanese civic and business development organizations, and are a largely unrecognized part of Orange County’s history.

The property is currently owned by Rainbow Environmental Services (Rainbow), a waste transfer company. In November 2013, the Huntington Beach City Council voted 4-3 to certify an Environmental Impact Report (EIR), which rezones the property from residential to commercial/industrial. The Council also approved a Statement of Overriding Consideration—the action which allows demolition of all six structures. Although Rainbow agreed to provide preservationists until mid 2015 to find solutions to save the historic property, demolition of the site remains a possibility.

Members of the public are invited to learn more about what they can do to support these 11 historic places and hundreds of other endangered sites at http://www.preservationnation.org/

 
The Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission and manse with congregation in 1910, the year both structures were completed.  The rendering is based on a historical photograph depicting this scene. The actual Mission was a brushed white, while the manse was a classic red iron oxide stain. (Artwork by Huntington Beach resident Barbara Haynes, a member of the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force and Huntington Beach Historic Resources Board, June 2014.) © All rights reserved.

The 2014 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places (in alphabetical order):

Battle Mountain Sanitarium –Hot Springs, South Dakota. Battle Mountain Sanitarium has provided medical care to veterans in the region for more than a century, and is one of the few properties owned by the Department of Veterans Affairs to be designated a National Historic Landmark. Today, the VA is moving forward with a proposal to abandon the facility.

Bay Harbor’s East Island – Miami-Dade County, Florida. Bay Harbor’s East Island’s collection of Miami Modern buildings are threatened with demolition by development proposals.

Chattanooga State Office Building – Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Chattanooga State Office Building, a midcentury landmark in the heart of downtown, is threatened with demolition by its new owner.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Spring House - Tallahassee, Florida. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and constructed in 1954, Spring House is the only built private residence designed by Wright in the state of Florida, and its novel "hemicycle" form is one of very few surviving homes that Wright designed in this style. Weather and the ravages of time have deteriorated the building.

The Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission, 1910. Photo courtesy of Wintersburg Presbyterian Church. © All rights reserved.

HISTORIC WINTERSBURG - Huntington Beach, California. Historic Wintersburg is a Japanese American pioneer property with several existing structures that tell the story of Japanese American immigrants in Southern California, and is now threatened by demolition.

Mokuaikaua Church - Kailua Village, Kona, Hawaii. Mokuaikaua Church, completed in 1837, is Hawaii's first Christian Church and is at risk from both earthquake damage and natural wear and tear.

Music Hall - Cincinatti, Ohio. A National Historic Landmark, Music Hall has played a significant role in the cultural fabric of Cincinnati since it was built in 1878. Today, it is deteriorating and in need of extensive repairs.

The Palisades - Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Several generations have cherished the scenic Palisades cliffs along the Hudson River. Despite its designation as a National Historic Landmark, the LG Corporation plans to build an office tower along the cliffs in New Jersey, forever altering the landscape.

Palladium Building - St. Louis, Missouri. The Palladium Building housed a nightclub in the 1940s that - although restricted to a whites-only clientele - played a prominent role in the development of African American music. It now faces an uncertain future because it is not protected by local or national historic designations.

Shockoe Bottom - Richmond, Virginia. Once a center of slave trade in America, Shockoe Bottom was home to Solomon Northup's jail in "12 Years a Slave" and contains numerous underground artifacts. The site is threatened by potential development of a minor league baseball stadium.

Union Terminal - Cincinnati, Ohio. Union Terminal, an iconic symbol of Cincinnati and a world-class example of Art Deco architecture, is suffering from deterioration and is now in need of extensive - and costly - repairs.

Watch Status:
Federal Historic Tax Credit - Nationwide.  The Federal Historic Tax Credit, a proven tool to encourage preservation across the country, is currently threatened by tax reform on Capitol Hill.

America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places has identified more than 250 threatened one-of-a-kind historic treasures since 1988. Whether these sites are urban districts or rural landscapes, Native American landmarks or 20th-century sports arenas, entire communities or single buildings, the list spotlights historic places across America that are threatened by neglect, insufficient funds, inappropriate development or insensitive public policy. The designation has been a powerful tool for raising awareness and rallying resources to save endangered sites from every region of the country. At times, that attention has garnered public support to quickly rescue a treasured landmark; while in other instances, it has been the impetus of a long battle to save an important piece of our history.

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Watch for Historic Wintersburg's goldfish, representing the pioneer goldfish farm history of Historic Wintersburg.  (Artwork by Huntington Beach resident Barbara Haynes, a member of the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force and Huntington Beach Historic Resources Board, June 2014.) © All rights reserved.

  As we move forward, we ask the country's help to save this rare historic place, an American heritage site and civil liberties icon rich with cultural identity and many more stories to tell.  When the Wintersburg Mission was founded in 1904, small donations from around Orange County helped build what became the heart of the pioneer Japanese American community. Today, donations from around the country can help us save Historic Wintersburg for future generations.

   Thank you to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  We are grateful for your partnership in our efforts to save America's pioneer history.

   Join us TUESDAY, JUNE 24, at Huntington Beach's Red Table Restaurant! A percentage of your dining bill is donated to the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Fund. 



DONATE to the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Fund and help us save a precious historical site!  Go to http://www.huntingtonbeachca.gov/i_want_to/give/donation-wintersburg.cfm

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Historic-Wintersburg-Preservation-Task-Force/433990979985360

Historic Wintersburg author and preservation task force chair, @SurfCityWriter on twitter.

© All rights reserved.  No part of the Historic Wintersburg blog may be reproduced or duplicated without prior written permission from the author and publisher, M. Adams Urashima.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Rebuilding the pier in 1914

Above: Huntington Beach's wooden pier, 1906, a few years before Pacific storms damaged it.  A fixture on the coast since the late 1800s, the community rallied to rebuild and reopen the pier in June 1914. (Photo, City of Huntington Beach archives)

   From their first arrival in Wintersburg Village and Huntington Beach township, the pioneer community gravitated toward the beach for fishing and recreation.  The wide, open stretches of sandy beach were open to everyone.  
  
Left: One of several beach scenes included in the 1933 publication, Echo, produced with the assistance of the Smeltzer Japanese Association, which met above the Tashima Market in Wintersburg Village.  (Photo, Orange County Young Men's Association publication, Echo, 1933) © All rights reserved.

   For the Japanese community in the early 1900s, the beach was a place were there were no restrictions or discrimination as was found in movie theaters in Garden Grove and the Walker's and Yost theaters in Santa Ana* where rope lines separated the Japanese and Mexican community from Caucasian theater goers.  The beach and pier were open and free.


Right: Beach goers identified as Mr. Noguchi, Henry Kiyomi Akiyama (Charles Furuta's brother-in-law and fellow goldfish farmer), and Mr. Andow, at Huntington Beach circa 1915.  (Photo snip, University of California - Fullerton, Center for Oral and Public History, PJA 520) © All rights reserved


   "The most common beach which was used by the Japanese groups was Santiago Beach, which was on the terminal end of Bushard Street in Huntington Beach," recalled Clarence Nishizu during his 1982 oral history interview.**  "Another beach frequented was called the Jetty near the outlet of Santa Ana River between Huntington Beach and Newport." 

Left: Leonard Miyawaki with a leopard shark caught at Huntington Beach, circa 1924.  Leonard's father, Yatsumatsu Miyawaki, was a signer on the 1904 founding document for the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission.  Miyawaki also opened the first Japanese market in 1907 at 217 Main Street in the Talbert-Leatherman building, today the Longboard Restaurant and Pub. (Photo, University of California - Fullerton, Center for Oral and Public History, PJA 027) © All rights reserved.

   Nishizu said Japanese American groups "like the Japanese Language School, Orange County Young Mens' Association, judo groups, church groups" gathered at the beach for picnics, clamming, swimming and sunbathing, experiencing  no formal segregation, "no discrimination."  The beach then, as today, was one of the free public spaces for which there were no restrictions based on ethnicity.

   Journalist Neeta Marquis had written about the atmosphere in Orange County in 1913, observing the working relationships and friendships among the Japanese pioneer community and others in Orange CountyMarquis had come to interview the first clergy of the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church, Reverend Joseph K. Inazawa and his wife, Kate Goodman.  While their marriage made headlines around the world, it was simply accepted in Wintersburg.  Marquis noted there were many multi cultural ventures and civic events.

   “…others all over Southern California are having similar experiences in both the business and the social world—very especially among the agricultural classes owning and working the great celery fields of Orange County," wrote Marquis.  "...The entire countryside accepted the invitation of the Japanese to join them in their celebration of the Emperor’s last birthday."

Above: Clamming at Huntington Beach, circa 1935. (Photo, University of California - Fullerton, Center for Oral and Public History, PJA 355) © All rights reserved.

   Marquis was writing about events in 1912 that brought Orange Countians together.  At that time, much of the Huntington Beach pier had fallen into the sea after fierce Pacific storms.  

   The Huntington Beach board of trustees (predecessor to the city council), approved Ordinance No. 91 on May 13, 1912, regarding the issuance of a $70,000 bond for the "construction and completion of a municipal wharf for the water front."  Two weeks later, Huntington Beach leaders would meet with the growing Japanese community from Wintersburg Village and the surrounding area.  If Huntington Beach was going to rebuild its pier, the township would need help from around the County.

Above: A gathering on the steps of the Huntington Inn, May 31, 1912, thought to be about fundraising support for the pier.  The crowd includes Huntington Beach's first mayor, Ed Manning (second row, far right in light-color suit),   another Huntington Beach mayor, Orange County supervisor, and pioneer realtor, Thomas Talbert (second row on step, fourth from left with hat in hand), Wintersburg Mission clergy, Reverend Hisakichi Terasawa (front row, fourth from right), Charles Mitsuji Furuta (front row below step, second from left), and at center next to Rev. Terasawa, a two-time Huntington Beach mayor (1914-1916 and 1918-1919) Eugene French. (Photo, Wintersburg Presbyterian Church) © All rights reserved

   Relationships among Huntington Beach leaders and those in Wintersburg Village had already been established.  When the Wintersburg Mission sought donations for the 1910 Mission building, contributions came from around the County and from Huntington Beach businesses and individuals.  Among the names recorded as contributing to the Wintersburg Mission are some of Huntington Beach township's founding families.


Left: From the archives of the present-day Wintersburg Presbyterian Church, a report listing the donors for the 1910 Mission in Wintersburg Village. (Image, Wintersburg Presbyterian Church)

   Asking for community help was a pioneer farming country practice, everyone helped each other.  Instead of raising a barn, this time the community raised a pier.

   When the pier was finally ready to re-open in 1914---one hundred years ago this month---the community held a party the likes of which had not been seen before.  A reported total of 20,000 people attended the two-day festivities, many riding Henry Huntington's Pacific Electric Railway to town.  There would be music and baseball (the team from Garden Grove vs. the Pacific Electric team), swimming and diving competitions, and a sack race.  

   One of the exciting highlights of the pier re-dedication was the surfing demonstration by Hawaiian-Irish surfer George Freeth, considered the first surfer in Southern California and the first to surf the pier.  He would forever set the tone for future generations: surfing the Huntington Beach pier means you're a pro.

Above: A group from the Garden Grove Japanese Language School at an outing at Huntington Beach, circa 1927.  The Garden Grove school was located at 10771 Sherman Street near Garden Grove Boulevard and was demolished to make way for a Costco shopping center, despite its historic status. (Photo snip, University of California - Fullerton, Center for Oral and Public History, PJA 204) © All rights reserved.


   There was another featured event that day that demonstrated the support and community involvement of the Japanese pioneer community.  After George Freeth's "surf board riding" and before the grand finale of the concert band and pier illumination, thousands of visitors witnessed a "Japanese fencing and sword dance" demonstration, most likely a kembu performance.  Like all the day's events, the performance represented the community and those who had supported the rebuilding of the pier.


Right: The June 12, 1914, Huntington Beach News lists events planned for June 20 to mark the dedication of the new concrete pier.  The Huntington Beach News reported 20,000 visitors came for the pier dedication and provides the events calendar with Japanese fencing and sword dance at 4:30 p.m., just before the band concert and pier "illumination."  Reverend Kenji Kikuchi of the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission belonged to one of the many Japanese fencing clubs

   The Japanese sword dance also was an indicator of Samurai origins for some.  Reverend Terasawa and Reverend Kenji Kikuchi of the Wintersburg Mission, Yukiko Yajima Furuta, Masako Tashima of Wintersburg's Tashima Market, Clarence Nishizu, and Maki Kanno (mother of Fountain Valley's first mayor, James Kanno), among others, had Samurai ancestry.  Community involvement and civic responsibility was second nature.

   "We were indoctrinated with the spirit of bushido..." explained Clarence Nishizu in his oral history interview.**  "There are countless stories in Japanese history of a Samurai giving his life to prove the avowed sense of ethical code of loyalty to one's lord. This is synonymous to the spirit of Americanism as written in the American creed to love one's country and to support its Constitution and defend it against all enemies."

   Performed in feudal times as an exercise in courage or mental concentration, it is performed by women and men.  A video of a sword dance performed in Los Angeles' Little Tokyo can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ste5UCxKqMs  

Above: A generation after the Issei, or Japanese immigrants arrived in Orange County, the American-born Nisei had fully adopted the Southern California beach lifestyle.  An account of the Japanese baseball league that practiced across the street from the Mission in Wintersburg Village notes the coach had trouble getting players to practice, as they preferred the beach. (Photo, A humorously titled image of a gathering at Huntington Beach from the Orange County Young Men's Association publication, Echo, from 1933) © All rights reserved.
   
   Imagine the hushed crowd at the pier in 1914 as they watched, the ocean waves crashing in the background.  Undoubtedly, few in the crowd had seen a sword dance before that day. 

   The sword dance also was a signal that Huntington Beach was inviting the world to take a look at the growing beach town.  The pioneer community already spoke a half dozen languages in addition to English and Japanese, including Spanish, Italian, German, Armenian and Tagalog.  California was gearing up for the Panama Pacific International Exposition in 1915, marking the opening of the Atlantic to the Pacific via the Panama Canal.  There was an enthusiasm in California for all things new, inventive, and international.  On June 20, 1914, the town was bubbling over with civic pride, thousands of people, and a reported 1500 automobiles parked up and down the coastline. 

Above: A beach party at Huntington Beach, circa 1933-1935.  The Japanese Language Schools, Mission and Japanese Association regularly held events at the beach and in Huntington Beach's downtown parks. (Photo, University of California - Fullerton, Center for Oral and Public History, PJA 357) © All rights reserved.

One hundred years of gratitude
   The Huntington Beach pier has battled Pacific storms more than once, with the community rebuilding it each time.  In 1988, the ocean again took parts of the pier out to sea.  

   Among those who contributed to rebuild the pier for its 1992 re-opening, was Huntington Beach's Sister City of Anjo, Japan, with a contribution of $92,000.00---more than the total cost of the pier in 1914.  The design replicated the architectural structure of the 1914 pier.

   On June 21 and 22 this year, special events will remember Huntington Beach's "100 Years of Surfing."  There again will be surfing demonstrations, music, speeches (see information at http://www.huntingtonbeachca.gov/announcements/attachments/100Years_Postcard-may%2028%20%283%29.jpg

   As the community marks the 100-year anniversary  of surfing at the"longest pier on the coast," we also remember and extend gratitude to the Japanese pioneers in 1912 and, in more recent times, our friends in Anjo, Japan, who helped build it. 


*Walker's Theater in Santa Ana originally opened as the Temple Theater in 1909.  It was demolished in the early 1960s.  The Yost Theater still exists as a historic music and event venue on Spurgeon Street in Santa Ana.
** Clarence Nishizu's oral history interview was conducted in 1982 for the Honorable Stephen K. Tamura Orange County Japanese American Oral History Project by Professor Emeritus Arthur A. Hansen.
 ***We continue to identify the people in this photograph.  If you spot someone you know (and can document the identity), please contact Historic Wintersburg via SurfCityWriter@yahoo.com 

© All rights reserved.  No part of the Historic Wintersburg blog may be reproduced or duplicated without prior written permission from the author and publisher, M. Adams Urashima.